Visiting artist residency at USC School of Cinematic Arts, LA (Part 5) / by Anna Madeleine

This week I started using the Oxberry down shooter for the first time. I worked on some more charcoal animation to get the hang of it. It allows for a lot of flexibility in terms of materials and lighting, and is really nice to have big blocks of time in a studio dedicated to animation.

More galleries on the weekend - tried to explore Culver City but it was Labor day weekend so many of them were closed, although we did find this great exhibition by Joseph Stashkevetch at Von Lintel Gallery of large scale works made of heavy paper torn and reformed into sculptural objects. It was fascinating how the paper was drawn on both sides so they were quite seamless while they were actually torn up and reconstructed.

Hauser & Wirth was showing an awesome exhibition - 'Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947 – 2016'. My favourite works here were by Phyllida Barlow, Jackie Winsor, Shinique Smith and Sonia Gomes, in the room focussing on a new generation of sculptors and including some especially commissioned work. The collection highlighted a really interesting approach to textiles and fabric, making works that were nicely imperfect, kind of messy, made of shapes, chunks, stuffed forms, strings and pom poms and reminded me of body parts or flesh kind of in the realm of Louise Bourgeois, or shapes and forms like soft molecular structures.

Jackie Winsor, 30 to 1 Bound Trees

Jackie Winsor, 30 to 1 Bound Trees

Sonia Gomes, Torções Circulares series  

Sonia Gomes, Torções Circulares series
 

After the speculation of whether we would need to line up for hours to get into the Broad, we got tickets to Cindy Sherman and walked straight in. The Cindy Sherman show was an eye-opener for me, having seen snippets of her work throughout art school but never having sat down and comprehensively studied her work. As a collection, they are quite incredible, exaggerating the ability to manipulate and transform the body into different identities. The exhibition was put together really well against dark walls, and presented a theatrical journey from her early to current work, leaving open what might come next.

The Broad’s permanent collection further concreted the influence of Pop Art on West Coast art, with Jeff Koons, Damien Hirst, Roy Lichtenstein and Ed Ruscha dominating the epic third floor gallery. My favourite moment was when a viewer broke out into a perfect moonwalk dance sequence in front of Koons’ Michael Jackson - only in LA!

En route to the Broad..

En route to the Broad..

Kara Walker, African't

Kara Walker, African't